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DateOriginal Topic
16th February 2004Newbie Neuville Print Question
By Robert Campbell
Sorry for the intrusion. I was hoping someone could assist me identifying which print I have.

I purchased a print of Neuville's Defence of Rorke's Drift at an auction very cheaply because I liked it. I was told after that this was a limited edition print and retailed in a gallery for $850 US but, I have no idea how properly categorize it.

Is there somewhere I can go that would allow me to identify which print I have and if what I was told is true.

Thank you,

Robert Campbell
DateReplies
16th February 2004John Young
Robert,

Anything special about the print? Any accompanying text or any vignettes within the border of the print?

Texture of the print? Modern or contempoary? Given those I might be able to assist.

John Y.

16th February 2004Julian Whybra
Look carefully. Is it a photograph or a print?
16th February 2004Robert Campbell
Julian:

I do not know how to tell if it is a photograph or a print. I purchased a few Brandenburg Wolf "posters" 15 years ago, assuming those are what is meant by "photographs" this is a much heavier stock paper.

John:

I do not know how to tell if the texture is modern or contemporary.

The print itself is on a heavier white stock (thick enough so I THINK that you wouldn't roll it), that has been attached to a thin cardboardish type backing.

Aside from the text (below) there does not appear to be any other markings.

The following it the text, broken up by line that is written. The text is encased by two medals (presumably Distinguished Conduct and Victoria Cross).

Line One

Presumably the title goes here but is covered by matting material and I don't want to lift

Line Two

January 22nd 1879

Line Three

On January 22nd 1879, during the Zulu War the small British field hospital and supply depot at Rorke’s Drift in Natal was the site of one of the most heroic military defenses of all time. Manned by 140 troops of the 24th Regiment, led by Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, the camp was attacked by a well-trained and well-equipped Zulu army of 4000 men, heartened by the great Zulu victory over the British forces at Isandlhlwana earlier on the same day. The battle began in mid afternoon,

Line Four

when British remnants of the defeat at Isandlhlwana struggled into the camp. Anticipating trouble, Chard set his small force to guard the perimeter fence but, when the Zulu attack began, the Zulus came faster than the British could shoot and the camp was soon overcome. The thatched roof of the hospital was fired by Zulu spears wrapped in burning grass and even some of the sick and dying were dragged from their beds and pressed into the desperate hand-to-hand fighting. Eventually, Chard gave the

Line Five

order to withdraw from the perimeter and to take position in a smaller compound, protected by a hastily assembled barricade of boxes and it was from behind this barricade that the brazen fought for their lives throughout the night. After twelve hours of battle, the camp was destroyed, the hospital had burned to the ground, seventeen British lay dead and ten were wounded. However, the Zulus had been repulsed and over 400 of their men killed. The battle of Rorke’s Drift is one of the greatest examples of

Line Six (centered)

Bravery and heroism in British military history. Nine men were awarded Distinguished Conduct Medals (right) and Eleven, the most ever given for a single battle, received the highest military honour of all, the Victoria Cross (left).

Line Seven (hand written in ink)

26 x 40 – 3 – 2 off white fillet

If there is anything else I can add, or if I have misunderstood something (always a real possibility) please let me know.

Thank you,

Robert Campbell
16th February 2004Robert Campbell
Julian:

I do not know how to tell if it is a photograph or a print. I purchased a few Brandenburg Wolf "posters" 15 years ago, assuming those are what is meant by "photographs" this is a much heavier stock paper.

John:

I do not know how to tell if the texture is modern or contemporary.

The print itself is on a heavier white stock (thick enough so I THINK that you wouldn't roll it), that has been attached to a thin cardboardish type backing.

Aside from the text (below) there does not appear to be any other markings.

The following it the text, broken up by line that is written. The text is encased by two medals (presumably Distinguished Conduct and Victoria Cross).

Line One

Presumably the title goes here but is covered by matting material and I don't want to lift

Line Two

January 22nd 1879

Line Three

On January 22nd 1879, during the Zulu War the small British field hospital and supply depot at Rorke’s Drift in Natal was the site of one of the most heroic military defenses of all time. Manned by 140 troops of the 24th Regiment, led by Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, the camp was attacked by a well-trained and well-equipped Zulu army of 4000 men, heartened by the great Zulu victory over the British forces at Isandlhlwana earlier on the same day. The battle began in mid afternoon,

Line Four

when British remnants of the defeat at Isandlhlwana struggled into the camp. Anticipating trouble, Chard set his small force to guard the perimeter fence but, when the Zulu attack began, the Zulus came faster than the British could shoot and the camp was soon overcome. The thatched roof of the hospital was fired by Zulu spears wrapped in burning grass and even some of the sick and dying were dragged from their beds and pressed into the desperate hand-to-hand fighting. Eventually, Chard gave the

Line Five

order to withdraw from the perimeter and to take position in a smaller compound, protected by a hastily assembled barricade of boxes and it was from behind this barricade that the brazen fought for their lives throughout the night. After twelve hours of battle, the camp was destroyed, the hospital had burned to the ground, seventeen British lay dead and ten were wounded. However, the Zulus had been repulsed and over 400 of their men killed. The battle of Rorke’s Drift is one of the greatest examples of

Line Six (centered)

Bravery and heroism in British military history. Nine men were awarded Distinguished Conduct Medals (right) and Eleven, the most ever given for a single battle, received the highest military honour of all, the Victoria Cross (left).

Line Seven (hand written in ink)

26 x 40 – 3 – 2 off white fillet

If there is anything else I can add, or if I have misunderstood something (always a real possibility) please let me know.

Thank you,

Robert Campbell
16th February 2004John Young
Robert,

It is a modern print, did you get it from E-bay, for about £35?

John Y.
16th February 2004John Young
Robert,

Have a look at http://www.military-art.com/dhm202.htm - I take it your's is the first one.

John Y.
16th February 2004Robert Campbell
John:

I did not get it on ebay. I got it at a real live in-person auction for $20 Cdn (only bidder).

I had previously checked that site prior to posting on here. The main difference is that the description lists "and a listing of the VC winners and DCM Winners. " Mine does not have any listing of names. Which indicated to me (possibly wrongly) that it was a different print.

Thanks,

Robert Campbell