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AMB


Joined: 07 Oct 2005
Posts: 899
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Zulu?

Great title...

Is that a film?

AMB
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Peter Ewart


Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 1797
Location: Near Canterbury, Kent, England.
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But would the alternative versions be any more accurate than the ones we know? The arrival of the relief column - in the form of a regiment of Lancers, no less - was filmed as the ending for Zulu but was cut, according to Knight & Castle in The ZW Then & Now (and no doubt confirmed in Sheridan's work?)

Alternative possibilities for the fate of RMS Titanic are tempting. If the heroic Lightoller had gone down with the ship, he would never have been able to take his vessel from Ramsgate across to Dunkirk and back 28 years later, presumably the only man to take part in two of the most memorable nautical dramas of the 20th century. Dunkirk (1958) could be remade to include Lightoller this time (played by More again, of course, as in A Night to Remember) alongside a grateful John Mills?

G - but which tune would the RD defenders sing? The arguments about the words of Men of H., apparently rewritten for the film, would be as nothing compared to the row over whether to get the men to sing NMGTT to Horbury, Bethany or Propior Deo. I suspect Ivor Emmanuel and his trusty chapelites would have insisted on the latter. There have been many Titanic films but I've only seen A Night to Remember - quite a distinct boyhood memory. Did the more recent film about the disaster perpetuate the story - and if so, which tune did they use this time? Perhaps the chance was missed when Kenneth Griffith was still with us. As radio operator he was there - at least in classic celluloid - and given his film-making prowess on R/Drift, would have been the ideal Taff to conduct Ivor's little choir ...

Peter

P.S. Have to agree on the need to replace Bromhead's strangulated tones. Not sure whether MC (sorry, apparently Sir MC) or BL should receive the coveted Dick van Dyck award for their contribution to baffling accents in the film industry. Perhaps the Bromhead or Durnford families should decide?
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John Young


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 1001
Location: Lower Sheering, Essex
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Peter,

On your point about Kenneth Griffith, he was actually asked to write a screenplay on Rorke's Drift by John & Roy Boulting, which pre-dated the filming of Zulu by five years or so. It was at a time when Roy & John were endeavouring to shed the comedy mantle.

As to him being 'the ideal Taff' that wasn't a thought shared by those involved in the production of Zulu. However his former understudy with the Old Vic, Richard Davies, did make it into the film.

Kenneth was also approached to appear in Zulu Dawn, but due to work commitments he had to decline to play John William Colenso.

John Y.
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Galloglas
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Peter,

This is by no means original and I cannot recall who first said it to me.

Hoewever, taking account of Monmouthshire having been an English county in 1879, and there apparently therefore being more people of Irish descent than Welsh at Rorke's Drift, then the ideal choice - of course - would be Val Doonican.

And, perhaps singing that wonderful old tune: "If you're Irish, come into the Laager".
But it may be that Victor McLaglen had already died and could not be cast as CSgt Bourne. A great pity, Mr Bromhead darlin'...Mister Witt would have had to have been a bit nippier to get to the gin bottle before everybody else though.

G

PS Well, it is Christmas after all.
The Scorer


Joined: 27 Nov 2006
Posts: 333
Location: Newport
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Galloglas wrote:
Peter,

This is by no means original and I cannot recall who first said it to me.

Hoewever, taking account of Monmouthshire having been an English county in 1879, and there apparently therefore being more people of Irish descent than Welsh at Rorke's Drift, then the ideal choice - of course - would be Val Doonican.

G

PS Well, it is Christmas after all.


But, surely, wouldn't his rocking chair have got in the way something awful?

Smile
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John Young


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 1001
Location: Lower Sheering, Essex
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Scorer,

Never mind the rocking chair, those jumpers would put terror into the Zulu!

John Y.
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Sawubona


Joined: 09 Nov 2005
Posts: 1179
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"Jumpers"?
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Alan
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Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 1501
Location: Wales
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Jumpers.


Last edited by Alan on Fri Dec 16, 2011 6:00 pm; edited 2 times in total

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Sawubona


Joined: 09 Nov 2005
Posts: 1179
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I think I got this! If "his jumpers would put terror into the heart of the Zulu" and I find his sweater a bit terrifying, then by extrapolation "jumpers" is another word for "sweaters"? I thought a "jumper" might be what we call a "walker", but how anyone could use more than one walker and why a Zulu would be fearful of one confused me.

Wow, that one went right over the head of certain provincial yank. Are all sweaters called jumpers over there or just that particular style? Or am I on the wrong track entirely and Zulus, in fact, have a deep-seated and irrational fear of guitars? Fenderphobes!
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Galloglas
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My mother's jumpers would. She knitted me a cricket sweater in 1959, and I've yet to grow into it.

G
Peter Ewart


Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 1797
Location: Near Canterbury, Kent, England.
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Saw - Yes, sweater, pullover & jumper are more or less interchangeable although there's probably a technical difference somewhere. Have used "jumper" myself for all versions since a child. Val - who I'd say probably flourished mostly in the '60s & '70s - is/was a national treasure. Perhaps our own rather cuddly & Irish version of your late Jim Reeves?

Gallo - someone told your mother (correctly) that the fashion at that time was to wear cricket jumpers which stretched almost down to the knees - late '50s, early '60s. Sloppy Joes. Ted Dexter was a perfect example of this at the time. So you weren't meant to grow into it. Now take up the game again and wear it!!!

Peter
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Martin Everett


Joined: 01 Sep 2005
Posts: 785
Location: Brecon
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Peter

Now you have explained 'jumpers' - perhaps you could help with 'monkey feathers'?

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Martin Everett
Brecon, Powys
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Sawubona


Joined: 09 Nov 2005
Posts: 1179
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Anyone who is wondering where Martin's remark came from needs to check out the following link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3nZd0nDhZY
And before they get too wound up about this anathema , note that this is, in fact, the John Barry Group and is from the sound track album for that same movie. What's not to love about Youtube excepting that "The Man" is constantly trying to control it's inherent anarchy. Sony is OK, but WMG is too draconian and has trashed at least two of my videos (and a zillion others as well) . But that's a whole different thread entirely and it certainly belongs on a whole different site.

"My monkey has grown feathers!"
"I'm so sorry to hear that."
"No problem! Now he can fly!"
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rich


Joined: 01 May 2008
Posts: 897
Location: Long Island NY USA
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and just wondering..did the "mods" go for that tune??? Wink..and for an opening few secs it gave a hint of the drums in "Glad All Over"...

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Rich
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Peter Ewart


Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 1797
Location: Near Canterbury, Kent, England.
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Martin/Saw: Well, that was a new one on me!

Rich: You've got a good memory - or do you still listen to the DC5?

Interestingly, this thread reminds us that many topics wander off the subject & then come back again, but this one could be around for a long time yet. After all, the 50 years since filming is still about a year and a half away and the release over two years off! For those of us who clearly remember its release and who recall its impact (at least on ourselves) the occasion is going to make us feel rather old!

Peter

PS. Did you realise, Rich, that GAO (according to a quick look on Wiki)reached No 1 in the British hit parade in Jan '64 - already a rather significant month for this thread! Coincidence! (Incidentally, my sons say it's not the "hit parade" any more, Dad, but the "UK Charts"!) In Jan '64 I don't think I'd heard of the United Kingdom, as apart from noticing the national label shown on the desk in front of each UN rep on TV, and the expression used by British servicemen when describing a home posting, I don't recall the expression as being hardly known, let alone used. The first time I saw it referred to I had to ask where it was! Now most youngish people here seem to refer to their country (correctly, I don't doubt) as the UK ("the Yookay"). Oh well.
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50 years of 'Zulu' soon
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