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I really liked seeing the full-scale Boer wagon laagar, it made quite an impression. Not sure I've heard of warriors being killed because they lost their assegai, but this might only have been from Shaka's era. Then again, I may just have forgotten. Rolling Eyes

I also liked having faces to names, as well as seeing various locations, such as the Killie Campbell Library.

All in all, it was an enjoyable programme to watch.

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Alan
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Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 1501
Location: Wales
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The waggons are even more amazing because they're made of bronze (or copper, can't remember which).

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tom


Joined: 02 Sep 2005
Posts: 45
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They obviously don't have the scrap dealers over there that we have here! Wink
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Peter Ewart


Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 1797
Location: Near Canterbury, Kent, England.
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Posting an actual picture is clearly too technical for me, so it looks as if the link will have to do - and even then only after enlisting help!
(there you go Peter - Alan)

Thanks, Alan! All there in "glorious Technicolor"! One day this Luddite might just pick up the rudiments of messing around with computers - but I doubt it! I was out when the programme was broadcast and although we now have a television set (marvellous invention but not marvellous enough to drag me away from a book) I wouldn't have the first clue about recording a programme on the machinery which sits below the TV, although I have successfully inserted & watched DVDs sent by Mel).

Just watched the first half of the programme online (it suddenly stopped for something to do with bandwidth - why are machines so unreliable?). Although the narrator obviously has to generalise and it is produced for a very general audience, it reminds me of most non-fiction TV, especially programmes ambitiously called "documentaries" - that is, the bloated script and the filming could have been covered in two or three paragraphs in a book.

Were the "tourist warriors" intended to give it an authentic feel? Although Shaka is described as controversial, and more recent research is briefly hinted at, only the standard (and outdated?) view of the mfecane was offered. The JSA extracts scene, used to illustrate Shaka's controversial role, was rather ponderous. The gold mine photos in the scrapbook, from the 20th century, appear to have been used to suggest the Zulu had become a curiosity by the 1870s. Slight of hand? Still, nice to see the bronze wagons & guns of "Dingane's Day" - now "Reconciliation Day." Reminded me of my own snaps! If I can, I'll try to watch the other half - I liked the shots in the Nkandla Valley so hopefully there are some more nice views later!

Peter


Last edited by Peter Ewart on Wed Feb 08, 2012 3:17 pm; edited 3 times in total
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peterw


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 865
Location: UK
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I watched it on iplayer last night. It was a 60 minute advert for the beauty and splendour of the area - I've never seen Isandlwana look so perfect. And the Drakensberg - wow.

The presenter was OK but I'm not sure the editing of the images and his voiceover worked in every case, namely the "fortification" of Rorke's Drift. And I did think the horns of the buffalo demonstration was a bit hammy. But I did enjoy the description and close up images of the kraals.

Peter
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Galloglas
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"Shacker" eh, whatever next!

'Gus' appears not to go into the countryside very often and it was a shame that he seemed unable to offer the simplest of courtesies in Zulu.

G
Keith Smith


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Posts: 540
Location: Northern NSW, Australia
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Saw; Rob D

Any number of such programs as 'expatshield' may change your web browser Home Page. To rectify this after use, simply navigate to your home page the hard way, then change your browser setting appropriately by using Tools/Internet Options. Make sure the Tab is General and you will see Home Page options at the top. If you are still on your normal Home Page, simply click on Use Current. This will be confirmed by the display of your Home Page's URL.

This only works, I should add, for Windows Internet Explorer.

KIS
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Sawubona


Joined: 09 Nov 2005
Posts: 1179
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Thanks, Kieth. I did get my old home page back pretty much in the same way and I use Firefox, so your advice is sound.
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Sawubona


Joined: 09 Nov 2005
Posts: 1179
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Got a copy of this program compliments of one of the denizens hereabouts. nGiyabonga! Excellent show. Nothing new for any but the most tyro of students of Zulu history and culture, but beautifully photographed and edited. I particularly enjoyed the host (and his hat, which unless I'm mistaken was an authentic Aussie Barmah, not unlike my own Smile). I'm not quite finished with it as yet, but I can say that watching it takes me away to Zululand without the agony of spending twelve hours in a Airbus without a cigarette!

Incidently, nice picture, Peter. I tend to favor the psychology theories of Arronson and Skinner, but were I of a Freudian bent then I'd feel compelled to conjecture that ...
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Peter Ewart


Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 1797
Location: Near Canterbury, Kent, England.
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Laughing Actually, nothing quite so complicated, Saw ...! All I can remember is thinking that if I sat there much longer my backside would be soaked, as it was raining hard at the time and the wheel on that cannon wasn't exactly dry.

An hour or so later the steep, muddy slope descending from Helpmekaar proved impassable to vehicles but the rain stopped at R/Drift and a few hours later over dinner at FDL, the late David Rattray promised us perfect weather while in his care - and he was right.

Peter
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Sawubona


Joined: 09 Nov 2005
Posts: 1179
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And then sometimes a cannon is just a cannon Wink
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Peter Ewart


Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 1797
Location: Near Canterbury, Kent, England.
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...and I suppose Freud could always be wrong? Wink

P.
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Sawubona


Joined: 09 Nov 2005
Posts: 1179
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I recall having read that the wagons and cannons are iron and merely plated in bronze although wiki states that they're cast bronze. My limited understanding of metallurgy tells me that "cast bronze" would mean that they're solid bronze. I would think that excessively costly and impractical and therefore unlikely. Sorry, Wiki, but I'll bet you're wrong.

Frankly I question even the iron claim when steel would seem more sensible. Wouldn't cast iron lack the tensile strength for those lantern whips?

Which segues into the next question rather nicely. Isn't that statue of Shaka in the documentary missing the lower half of the spear? I'm thinking that that's made of cast iron covered in bronze and that's why it snapped off so cleanly.

There's a nice short home video pan of the Blood River Monument at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-d295TuDXsA. It's worth a look.
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